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Results for search "Blood Pressure".

11 Sep

Sudden Low Blood Pressure May Signal Kidney Failure In Certain COVID-19 Patients

Researchers say reducing or eliminating blood pressure medications may help prevent severe kidney injury.

04 Sep

Having Your Pharmacist Monitor Your Blood Pressure Electronically Could Prevent Serious Heart Events

Patients who consistently report their numbers via telemonitoring experience fewer heart attacks and strokes, researchers say.

27 Aug

None Of The Most Common Blood Pressure Medications Increase The Risk Of Depression.

In fact, 9 of the drugs significantly lower the risk, according to researchers

Health News Results - 114

Pregnancy can increase the risk of a rare, dangerous heart condition called aortic dissection, researchers report.

This is especially true for women with underlying heart conditions that can go undetected.

Aortic dissections -- which affect 3 in 100,000 people per year -- cause the layers of the aorta to tear, and blood to pool or leak instead of flow normally. Patients requ...

Blood pressure among adults decreased significantly during a 45-year period, according to new research that may offer encouragement for the millions who continue to struggle to control their blood pressure.

The study, published Oct. 5 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation , sought to pinpoint the magnitude of blood pressure improvement in the United States betw...

Children who need to take oral steroids for chronic or life-threatening conditions can experience serious side effects, according to new research.

Children with autoimmune disorders such as juvenile arthritis, psoriasis or inflammatory bowel disease are often prescribed a steroid to keep the illness under control.

But the odds that a child might develop diabetes was nearly s...

Want to fend off high blood pressure? New research adds to the pile of evidence showing that living healthy can help you avoid hypertension.

The study included nearly 3,000 Black and white U.S. adults, aged 45 and older, who didn't have high blood pressure at the start of the study.

The participants' heart health was assessed with the American Heart Association's Life's Sim...

People with high blood pressure tend to fare worse when infected with COVID-19, and the chronic condition can complicate their treatment in unexpected ways, new research shows.

For example, some COVID-19 patients must be taken off their blood pressure medications if their blood pressure falls to dangerously low levels, a condition called hypotension. Otherwise, they'll risk dying or d...

People with fatter legs appear less likely to have high blood pressure, new research suggests.

The researchers suspect that measuring leg fat could help guide blood pressure prevention efforts. Those with bigger legs may not need to worry as much about high blood pressure -- a contributor to heart attack and stroke.

"Distribution of fat matters. Even though we think that f...

Uncontrolled high blood pressure is becoming more common among Americans, putting them at increased risk for heart attack and stroke, a new study shows.

Previous research showed that in 1999-2000, 32.2% of Americans maintained blood pressure less than 140/90 mm Hg, but the rate rose to 54.5% in 2013-2014. However, the rate fell to 48% in 2015-2016.

Unfortunately,...

It's probably a good idea to skip that second glass of wine if you have diabetes, because new research suggests that having more than one drink daily raises your risk of high blood pressure.

People with type 2 diabetes who had eight or more drinks a week (moderate drinkers) had more than 60% higher odds of having high blood pressure, according to the study. They also tended to ha...

Blood pressure drugs don't increase the risk of cancer, according to the largest study to examine the issue.

A possible link between blood pressure drugs and cancer has been the subject of debate for decades, but evidence has been inconsistent and conflicting.

For this study, researchers analyzed data from 31 clinical trials of blood pressure drugs that involved 260,000 peop...

Telemedicine might help people with stubbornly high blood pressure get their numbers down -- and possibly lower their risk of heart disease and stroke in the long run, a new study suggests.

Doctors already recommend that people with high blood pressure use a home monitor to track their numbers. But research suggests that home readings, alone, only make a small difference in getting th...

If you have hypertension and you're depressed, don't blame your blood pressure drugs.

Although previous research hinted there might be a connection between high blood pressure medications and depression, a new study of dozens of commonly used drugs found no such link.

In fact, the Danish researchers found the opposite -- nine blood pressure drugs were associated with a lowe...

In the largest such study yet, researchers have found that two classes of common blood pressure medications seem tied to better survival against COVID-19.

The U.K. findings should allay any worry that the two types of mediations -- angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) -- might actually harm COVID-19 patients.

"We k...

If you suffer from heart failure, try to stay calm. Stress and anger may make your condition worse, a new study suggests.

Mental stress is common in heart failure patients due to the complexities of managing the disease, progressively worsening function, and frequent medical issues and hospitalizations, according to lead author Kristie Harris, a postdoctoral associate in cardiovascul...

Feeling woozy when you stand up may be a sign of an increased risk of developing dementia, a new study suggests.

Doctors call this feeling "orthostatic hypotension," and it occurs when there's a sudden drop in blood pressure as you stand, explained a team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

The researchers found a connection between orth...

Your thinking skills may be at risk of declining in midlife if you smoke or have high blood pressure or diabetes, a new study suggests.

Heart disease risk factors -- especially high blood pressure and diabetes -- have become more common in midlife, the study authors noted.

"We found those two risk factors, as well as smoking, are associated with higher odds of having accel...

Coffee has been tied to many potential health benefits, but people should drink it for pleasure, and not disease prevention.

That's one of the main conclusions of a new research review. In it, researchers give an overview of the evidence on coffee and caffeine -- the subjects of many health studies over the years.

"The impact of coffee consumption on health is important beca...

Regular exercise can reduce your risk of high blood pressure, even if you live in an area with high levels of air pollution, new research shows.

The new study included more than 140,000 adults in Taiwan who did not have high blood pressure and who were followed for an average of five years.

The researchers found that those who were highly active and exposed to low levels of ...

Older, critically ill COVID-19 patients who are given a combination of two common antiretroviral drugs can experience a drastic slowing of their heart rate, French researchers report.

In their study of 41 patients treated with lopinavir and ritonavir twice daily for 10 days, 22% developed a slow heart rate condition called bradycardia. When the drugs were stopped or doses lowered,...

Millions of Americans take medication to keep their blood pressure down. A new study suggests that two types of blood pressure drugs might do double-duty, keeping colon cancer away, too.

Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (often called ACE inhibitors) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) help lower blood pressure by relaxing and opening up narrowed blood vessels, allowin...

Cardiologist Dr. Willie Lawrence remains haunted by the memory of police shooting his best friend during a 1966 race riot in Cleveland.

"I saw my best friend shot in the back and the leg by police. I saw his sister shot five times. I witnessed all that, and that impacted me for the rest of my life," said Lawrence, chief of cardiology at HCA Midwest Health's Research Medical Center in ...

A new study finds that 1 in 5 people under age 40 now have metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that together increase the odds for many serious conditions, including diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

The rate of metabolic syndrome is rising in all age groups -- as many as half of adults over 60 have it. But among 20- to 39-year-olds, the rate rose 5 percentage points over f...

Blood pressure drugs help even the most frail elderly live longer, and older people who are healthier get the biggest benefit, Italian researchers say.

"We knew that high blood pressure medication was protective in general among older people, however, we focused on whether it is also protective in frail patients with many other medical conditions who are usually excluded from randomi...

Among patients in China with COVID-19, researchers found that those with high blood pressure had twice the risk of death from the coronavirus compared with patients who didn't have high blood pressure.

And patients with high blood pressure who were not taking drugs to control it were at even higher risk, the findings showed. However, the study only found an association and could not ...

Many people with high blood pressure may have an unrecognized hormonal condition driving their numbers up, a new study suggests.

The condition, called primary aldosteronism, arises when the adrenal glands overproduce the hormone aldosterone. That causes the body to retain sodium and lose potassium, spurring a spike in blood pressure.

Doctors have long considered the conditio...

High blood pressure is one of the top risk factors for heart attack and stroke. It's also common among people who develop severe symptoms of COVID-19.

So, with more people at home practicing social distancing and with fewer chances to check blood pressure at public pharmacy machines or doctor visits, it's more important than ever to know how to do it at home.

How do I se...

It's a myth that heart attacks are a "man's disease." Yet a new research review confirms that women remain less likely than men to get medications routinely recommended for preventing heart trouble and strokes.

Researchers found that across 43 international studies, a general pattern emerged: Women with risk factors for heart disease and stroke were less likely than men to be prescrib...

Intensive high blood pressure treatment may protect against a-fib, a heart rhythm disorder that can lead to stroke, heart attack and heart failure, researchers say.

They analyzed data from more than 8,000 high blood pressure patients who were at increased risk of heart disease and enrolled in a U.S. National Institutes of Health trial known as SPRINT.

Participants were on e...

Believing that you won't have a second stroke may help you control your blood pressure, a new study suggests.

A positive attitude about your health can go a long way in maintaining cardiovascular health, especially for women, researchers say.

"Targeted strategies to improve health beliefs after stroke may be an important component to include in risk-factor management among...

The term "high blood pressure" rarely conjures images of young, playful children.

But the condition doesn't just affect adults. In children, it can be caused by obesity, kidney disease, heart abnormalities or other factors. Hypertension at such a young age puts kids at risk for heart disease and stroke later in life.

"With obesity on the rise, we do see quite a few kids with hig...

Obesity, type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure increase teens' risk of premature blood vessel aging, a new study finds.

"Our study demonstrates that the slow changes in blood vessels that lead to the development of atherosclerosis [narrowing of the arteries] begins early in life," said lead author Justin Ryder. He's an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Minnesota ...

Electronic cigarettes that contain nicotine may prompt spikes in blood pressure and heart rate in the young, a new study suggests.

Research has shown that traditional cigarettes trigger increases in blood pressure and heart rate and lower so-called muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) -- a measurement of nerve messages to blood vessels that quickly responds to changes in blood pre...

Nighttime high blood pressure could harm the brain, a new study says.

Most people's blood pressure goes down during the night, which is called dipping. But in some people, it stays the same or even rises -- called reverse dipping.

Folks with high blood pressure and reverse dipping may be at increased risk for vascular damage in the brain and associated memory problems, accor...

Pilates exercises can do more than help strengthen your abs -- the moves may also lower high blood pressure and reduce artery stiffness, new research suggests.

Pilates is a workout program that focuses on core strength, flexibility, body posture and controlled breathing.

The new study included 28 obese women, aged 19 to 27, with high blood pressure ("hypertension"). The part...

Could a blood pressure or diabetes medicine make COVID-19 more severe?

A new theory suggests the coronavirus could be binding to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors in the lower respiratory tracts. Commonly used drugs like ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are often used to control heart failure and blood pressure. But animal research suggests the...

If you have high blood pressure, you can take steps to lower it by walking more every day, new research suggests.

In the study, researchers analyzed data from about 640 adults who participated in the Framingham Heart Study, which focuses on heart disease risk factors and has been ongoing for more than 70 years.

Participants were asked to wear smart watches that tracked the n...

There's been a sharp increase in high blood pressure-related deaths in the United States, particularly in rural areas, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 10 million U.S. deaths between 2007 and 2017 and found that death rates linked to high blood pressure (hypertension) rose 72% in rural areas and 20% in urban areas.

The increase was highest in ...

If you're at high risk for heart disease, lowering your blood pressure below the standard target level may help extend your life, a new study suggests.

Specifically, a systolic blood pressure target of less than 120 mm Hg -- rather than the standard 140 mm Hg -- could give someone an extra six months to three years of life, depending on their age when they begin intensive blood pressu...

All new mothers should know the signs and symptoms of high blood pressure, even if they don't have a history of the condition, researchers say.

It's not uncommon for high blood pressure to occur after childbirth. If the high blood pressure isn't treated, women can be at risk for stroke and other serious problems. In some cases, it can result in death.

It's unclear what cause...

A specific collection of gut bacteria may be a culprit in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a new study shows.

PAH is a chronic disease marked by the narrowing of arteries that supply blood to the lungs. With constant high blood pressure in these arteries, the right side of the heart is forced to work harder, which can result in right-sided heart failure. Sympt...

Millions of Americans with high blood pressure are at risk of heart attack and stroke, but just a few changes might cut that risk.

"In February, American Heart Month, we encourage all Americans to take control of their heart health by better understanding and monitoring their blood pressure levels and making healthy lifestyle changes that can significantly reduce their risk of serious...

Having high blood pressure in a first pregnancy quadruples a woman's risk of heart attack or death from heart disease, a new study finds.

About 2% to 8% of pregnant women with previously normal blood pressure develop a condition called preeclampsia, which includes high blood pressure that usually begins after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

In this study, Rutgers University ...

Patients taking a common diuretic to help lower blood pressure may be better off with a similarly effective but safer one, a new study suggests.

Current guidelines recommend the drug chlorthalidone (Thalitone) as the first-line diuretic. But it can have serious side effects that can be avoided with another diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), researchers say.

"Diur...

Popular media often portrays heart disease as a man's problem, but new research suggests that women's blood vessels actually age faster than men's do.

The new study found that blood pressure started increasing in women as early as the third decade of life, and it continued to rise higher than blood pressure in men throughout the life span.

The researchers said that this...

If you plan to make a New Year's resolution about improving your health, the American Medical Association (AMA) has some good suggestions.

"With too many holiday sweets and not enough exercise likely in the rearview mirror, now is the perfect time to consider your personal goals and how you can make positive health choices in the coming year," AMA President Dr. Patrice Harris said in ...

Fear of deportation doubles the risk of high blood pressure in Mexican-born women in farmworker families who live in California's Salinas Valley, a new study claims.

It included 572 women, average age 39, who in 2012-2014 were asked to rate their level of worry about deportation for themselves or others as low (28%); moderate (24%); or high (48%).

Researchers lin...

Emergency room visits for high blood pressure surged following last year's recall of the popular heart drug valsartan, Canadian researchers report.

Within the first month of the recall, there was a 55% increase of people coming to Ontario-area emergency departments complaining of high blood pressure, said lead researcher Cynthia Jackevicius. She is a senior scientist with the Inst...

Tighter control of high blood pressure may add years to people's lives, a new study estimates.

Researchers calculated that for a typical 50-year-old with high blood pressure, more aggressive treatment could translate into three extra years of life. Eighty-year-olds would have less time to gain, but it could extend their lives by an average of 10 months, the study projected.

...

Imagine that your doctor could predict your risk of kidney disease in the next five years with a simple calculation.

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore report they have done just that.

"With the risk equations that we've developed, physicians should be able to determine with high accuracy who will or won't develop chronic kidney disease in the next few ye...

Taking blood pressure medications at bedtime rather than in the morning nearly halves the risk of dying from a heart attack, stroke or heart failure, a large, new study finds.

Researchers in Spain followed more than 19,000 adults with high blood pressure. They found that people who took all their blood pressure meds at night had lower blood pressure around the clock compared to volunt...

Chronically high levels of stress may increase black Americans' risk of high blood pressure, a new study suggests.

"Given the disproportionately high burden of hypertension in African-Americans, determining if chronic stress increases the risk of hypertension in this population is an important question that could guide prevention strategies," said lead study author Tanya Spruill, an a...

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